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28 April 2006

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William Henderson

Thanks for the comments. Until Jason mentioned it, I had not attributed an interest in ELS to Univ of Chicago per se. But I know several recent UC alums interested in empirical work. To name four on this blog: Ford, Czarnezki, Pfaff, Henderson. There are many others. bh.

Alfred Brophy

Bill,

Great post, as always. This is one of my favorite lines I've seen in a blog in a long time: "I remain convinced that it is possible to build a respectable career in legal academia just by running a simple arbitrage between legal topics and relevant social science literature." Ah, so, so true. In fact, one of the things the legal academy needs are people who can import the insights of the social sciences into law school.

Jason Czarnezki

There are also good comments/advice for those beginning empirical legal scholars at:

http://www.elsblog.org/the_empirical_legal_studi/2006/04/its_my_first_ti.html

Jason Czarnezki

This is a great post. I would only add that any perspective empirical legal scholars shouldn't be initimidated by any statistical software, and I'd encourage experimentation with various STATA commands and sample data sets; though gaining familiarity with stats programs is clearly a benefit of Bill's suggestion that one should attend workshops.

It's clear Bill and I, as JD-only empirical legal scholars, have the same roots at Chicago having been both taught by Rosenberg and Bernstein (though having transferred from Wisconsin to Chicago, I was fortunate enough to also have Macaulay as my contracts professor). Students' future careers seem to be influenced by their past professors. Concurring opinions asks whether this can be empirically evaluated (at least for students who turn into judges) at:

http://www.concurringopinions.com/archives/2006/04/quantifying_the_1.html

frankcross

Great stuff. I found a new book I wanted and (thanks to the miracle of Amazon's recommendation algorithm) two others that you didn't list.

I would add: find an empiricist co-author and find somebody from elsewhere on the campus. Could be a professor who provides casual advice or could be a good economics PhD student research assistant.

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