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23 April 2007

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valtrex online

I think That can be over time, between cases, whatever, and you may not be able to do much in the first stages of research, but you certainly should try to get a comparative element in the picture asap. thanks

Tracy Lightcap

Yes, it was an interesting paper, wasn't it? It's like I'm always telling the students: you don't really know what any set of data is telling you until you have some sort of comparative basis for your analysis. That can be over time, between cases, whatever, and you may not be able to do much in the first stages of research, but you certainly should try to get a comparative element in the picture asap. Steve's paper, by comparing circuits both over time and between cases, answers very nicely. And, consquently, comes to some very interesting and useful conclusions that (mirabile dictu) address a real policy question of some moment.

I said at that panel that the panelists were addressing the SLiMES of judicial politics. SLiMES (Subsurface Lithographic Microbial Ecosystems) are colonies of bacteria existing below the surface from about 50 feet to 2 miles down in the Earth's crust. They probably contain more than a million species of bacteria - biologists have identified about 1000 - and probably mass greater then all the biota on the surface. We have just started to look at the basic data patterns of court systems below high courts. We need to get busy; that's where the action is.

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