« Help Wanted: LSAC Director of Research | Main | "Back to the Future, Again?" -- ELS in Context »

24 May 2007

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451b58069e200d83547d79f53ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Obligatory Baseball Post: Selection Bias:

Comments

Vimax

Respondents (there were over 1,000 of them) were first asked how interested they were in watching or following baseball.

buy cialis

next month I will present my graduation project. i was looking for about this long. your blog looks really interesting for me what I want to congratulate all the information and the work I do on his blog. great work

sildenafil citrate

Einer Elhauge is guest-blogging over at Volokh, and raising a bunch of interesting questions. One post draws a parallel between ELS and sabermetrics, leading one (clearly Boston-based) wag to ask, "if empirical legal studies are like sabermetrics, who is the legal equivalent of Joe Morgan?"

I'm not touching that one... But, in the spirit of the (baseball) season, I'd offer the following instead. Empirical researchers are taught early on to beware of selection bias -- drawing incorrect inferences from data which are nonrandomly sampled from a population. (An example would be concluding that early humans lived predominantly in caves, on the basis of finding paintings, remains of fire pits, and so forth there; because such artifacts are more likely to survive in caves than elsewhere, the available archaeological data are subject to selection bias). We also learn that there are ways of dealing with such data, including the class of "selection models" first developed by James Heckman.*

generic cialis

I am currently conducting an investigation regarding this issue. The information presented in your blog is really interesting so I want to thank and also congratulate the great work. thanks again.

generic viagra

i like this part of the post:"I offer this example to underscore a point that often gets lost in researchers' concerns about selection bias: The fact that one's data are somehow subject to a nonrandom selection process does not necessarily mean that selection bias will be the result. " is very good

Loans

Happy to read this - good read.

generic viagra

Accurate records are kept and updated for most sports at the highest levels, while failures and accomplishments are widely announced in sport news

Jordan 23 shoes on sale

I offer this example to underscore a point that often gets lost in researchers' concerns about selection bias: The fact that one's data are somehow subject to a nonrandom selection process does not necessarily mean that selection bias will be the result.

online pharmacy

But, in the spirit of the (baseball) season,

buy viagra

That is, individuals with no interest in baseball presumably can't have opinions about the DH, and so omitting them from our analysis is not a problem.

silagra

We also learn that there are ways of dealing with such data, including the class of "selection models" first developed by James Heckman.

buy viagra

Checking assumptions cannot be done with a computer; it requires a brain and an intelligible reasoning process.

William Henderson

Chris, I appreciate this post. I think one of the intellectual hurdles that law professors without formal social science training have to clear (i.e., people like myself) is that methodology is not mysticism. Checking assumptions cannot be done with a computer; it requires a brain and an intelligible reasoning process.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Conferences

December 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Site Meter


Creative Commons License


  • Creative Commons License
Blog powered by Typepad